We’ve all heard the saying, “Don’t judge a book by its cover,” but how often are we actually pleasantly surprised by what we discover? Rarely, right? Well, once you’ve listened to a few bars from B.Cooper, you’ll be glad you didn’t pass judgment.

At first glance, B.Cooper looks like that one guy you see at the gas station filling up his ‘93 green Cougar or that one guy you see walking through the suburbs wearing cargo shorts and New Balances. And he actually has been that one guy you see every week in the checkout lane with an apron and khakis. But he’s also that one guy sitting in the break room at work with headphones and a notepad with a dream and enough talent, heart, soul, and faith to see it come true.

Alabama born and bred, and also a product of Columbia, TN, Brad Cooper was fortunate to have two loving parents who taught him to love others. To this day, B.Cooper sites his upbringing as crucial to teaching him to build relationships and to informing his music, as his goal is to meet people where they are and lovingly lead them to solutions.

Like most boys, B.Cooper had hoop dreams and even baseball fantasies, but once he discovered how to expand his gift of poetry into 16-bar verses at the age of 14, his aspirations began to shift. After overcoming his fears and no longer just writing raps for his friends, B.Cooper recorded a few songs, and fell in love with rapping.

In 2003, B.Cooper teamed up with Dirty Rice for his first project, Reflections of Self, which offered a transparent look into his life. As B.C. became more and more convinced that impacting people through his music was his calling, in 2011 B.C. released his second album Cashier of the Month, the fruit of years of working side by side with Dirty Rice. Yet, he’d also been working 60 hours a week in a retail job, which left him little time to invest in music. He recalls joking with a co-worker one day, “I don’t have a new album, but I’m cashier of the month.” That became a defining moment for B.Cooper as he realized that his full-time job was keeping him from chasing his dream.

Still your average American, B.Cooper holds a blue collar job at General Motors. He also spends time working as a graphic designer and professional photographer. “If I speak it, I lived it or seen it with my own eyes,” and B.Cooper hopes his life experiences can help change the lives of all who take the time to listen.